Our Top 30 Tips for Flying with Kids – Before, During, After the Flight with Children

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We’re flying with kids all the time. There have been times when it has been a challenge, but it’s worth it.  Every time. Whether you’re flying with a baby, flying with a toddler, or traveling with a teen, there are tips and a mindset that can help make flying with kids a more pleasant experience.

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families.

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Travel with children already has its own unique set of challenges. When you throw in jet lag, bad food, and crowded, uncomfortable seating, it can bring out the worst in just about anyone, right?

We started our family in Tokyo, and we’ve been flying with kids soon after they were born in 2002 and 2006. We’ve done our best to learn from our children’s flying experiences, and learn from other traveling families we know. Some were flying with a baby. Others were flying with toddlers, tweens or teens. No matter the age, I hope these flying tips help you make the most of your travel day.

Some were flying with a baby. Others were flying with toddlers, flying with tweens or flying with teens. No matter the age, I hope these flying tips help you make the most of your travel day.

Top 30 TIPS FOR FLYING WITH KIDS

I’ve divided my tips for family travel day tips into the following categories:

  1. Before the Airport: From when you book the flight to the night before you leave
  2. At the Airport: When to arrive, and what to do before you board
  3. On the Plane: Flying tips from boarding to getting off the plane
  4. After You Land: What happens once you arrive

When you fly with kids, preparation helps, and the list of flying tips below are what I like to tick off whenever we fly with kids. A lot of this may sound like common sense, but you’d be surprised at how many families we see in airports that seem to have no clue what they’re doing.

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Our Top 30 Tips for Flying with Kids - Before, During, After the Flight with Children

We’re not airport experts, either — believe me. We’ve made stupid mistakes in airplanes and airports all over the world. We’ll likely continue to make flying mistakes, too. That said, we’re always improving how we fly with kids and I hope you can too.

These family flying tips are written to serve people flying with children, but many of these travel day advice could just as easily work for trains, buses, boats, and road trips.

I want this list of family travel day tips to be comprehensive, so please tell me your flying tips so that I can update these recommendations and make this post more useful. Either add them in the comments below or contact me directly.

BEFORE THE AIRPORT: Flying with Kids

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families.

Make Travel Day Special

If you’ll be flying with kids often, then this practice should start early, and can be especially effective with little ones.

Make travel day feel like a holiday.

Build anticipation and treat travel day like a special day. Have special food or new playthings ready for the airport — whatever your kids would look forward to. A new toy can go a long way. It doesn’t have to be something expensive, loud (certainly NOT), or complicated. Keep it cheap, simple and age appropriate.

We recommend special snacks, new books (including sticker books, coloring books, etc.) and possibly new apps or videos on any devices they use. If they’re really little, you can even wrap some items and hand them out over time, which gives them more to do.

Build Excitement

Kalli and Jacob Hiller from Epic Education Radio ep. #11 talk about building excitement in the days leading up to travel day. That way, their son Ryder is actually looking forward to going to the airport.

Flying with teens or tweens like ours? For them, making travel day special is more about having a nicer meal at the airport (depending on budget & availability). In addition, it’s all about loading them up with new apps, games, and Kindle books that they’ve had their eyes on. More books than anything else.

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Buy a Kindle to Travel with Hundreds of Books 

You know your child better than I do — what would make them excited about travel day?

Work as a Team (and Practice if needed)

Before you fly with kids, make sure they understand the importance of travel day and that you are depending on them to make it run smoothly — tell them that you need their help. Practice airport manners and routines if you need to: role-play walking through metal detectors and answering questions from make-believe immigration officers. In

In Epic Education Radio ep #25, Bliss Broyard talks about how she explained the importance of airport behavior. For younger kids, it can help to role-play how to act on an airplane as well.

Give older kids responsibilities in the airport. Tell them you’ll need their help to make this run smoothly. More on that below.

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families.

Sort Your Seating

If possible, book the window and aisle seats, leaving the center seat open. This increases your chances of having an empty seat for a kid to sprawl out on. At worst, whoever is sitting there is likely to agree to move to the window or aisle. No one wants to be stuck in-between a parent and a child — a nightmare for almost any passenger.

I’ll admit that this doesn’t happen as much anymore, simply because booking algorithms are getting smarter and airlines are trying to maximize occupancy more than ever. But if you’re flying with kids, it may be worth a try.

If you need a bassinet, sort that now, long before flight day.

Front or Back of the Plane??

When I fly with kids, I prefer sitting in the back of the plane, but if you have a connecting flight and the transfer time is only a few hours, I suggest sitting as close to the front of the plane as possible. Sometimes flights run late, which cuts your transfer time short, and you’ll need to get off the plane fast.

Most major flights now have personalized entertainment systems in each seat, but lots of older and/or smaller planes don’t — especially some of those that serve further-flung locations.

For example, in Southeast Asia, we’ve used low-cost airlines like Air Asia to fly to places in Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Vietnam, and Taiwan. And in Europe, we’ve flown Ryanair to the Lanzarote in the Canary Islands. While long-haul flights may have personal entertainment systems, many short-flight low-cost carrier planes don’t.

Before you fly with kids, use your airline’s website to check the plane model you’re flying. If you’re on an older model without individual screens (less likely as time passes, but it still happens) you might want to carry more books/toys/entertainment for the kiddos.

Schedule Your Flight

With their children flying often, many experienced family travelers’ flight tips include planning family flights during the child’s usual sleeping hours. That helps, and we do that when we can, but for us, the arrival time is more important.

For long-haul flights, we try to arrange to land in our destination mid- to late-afternoon because it helps us all readjust our body clocks faster. We arrive, get to our accommodation to drop off our stuff and then make sure we all stay out and about, moving around during the last hours of sunlight.

When kids fly, they often need to catch up on sleep regardless of what time you leave, but even though we’re exhausted after 12 hours in the air, we try to stay awake until a decent hour before sleeping. That means we don’t go to bed until 8 pm at the earliest — even when severely jetlagged. That way we’ll more likely sleep through the night and reset our circadian rhythms faster.

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families.

Pack the Afternoon Before Your Leave

Better flying with kids starts long before the airport. No matter when your departure time is, go to bed the night before with everything packed in its place and sitting by the door. Not just your flight essentials. Have everything ready — even the clothes you plan to wear to the airport.

The earlier you have everything sorted, the earlier you can catch mistakes, oversights and that travel essential that you almost forgot to pack. My wife and kids are great at this, but I’ll admit that I tend to be up late the night before a flight. I’d take even longer if I didn’t have my complete list of travel items on the Packing Pro app, which I use solely as a checklist.

Need a Luggage?
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Best Carry-On Luggage: Ultimate Guide for Your Next Travel

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Pack Full Sets of Clothes in Your Carry-On

When you fly with children, always pack a full set of clothes for every member of your family. Including you. Especially you.

Accidents happen on planes: drinks are spilled, diapers are dropped, and kids don’t make it to the toilet in time. What’s more, there could be a mix-up with your checked-in bags (rare, but it happens) and you won’t get them back for 24 hours or longer. Be prepared.

A prime example: my daughter and I flew together when she was around three. Just the two of us, from Tokyo to Atlanta. I had two full sets of clothes for her, but all my clothes were in my checked-in luggage. Of course, as Murphy’s Law would have it, she suddenly became ill and puked all over me during takeoff.

During takeoff…Let that sink in.

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families.

Just In Case. Bring Hyland’s 4 Kids Tummy Ache Tablets

Fortunately, she felt much better after emptying her digestive system on my shirt and lap, but that left me soaked in nastiness. If you include our transfer time to a connecting flight in Detroit (yet not enough time to go buy a t-shirt along the way), the trip was over 16 hours. I was wet, cold, and smelled like sour milk for all 16 hours.

Never again.

Check Your Luggage Weight

Nothing is worse than having to rummage through your bags at the check-in counter and make last-minute rearrangements in order to avoid additional weight fees. You hold up the line and look like an amateur. Jack and Aye from Epic Education Radio ep. #6 say they always carry a digital luggage scale to make sure they are underweight before they arrive at the check-in counter.
Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips for flying

Bring a  Tarriss Jetsetter Digital Luggage 

In Epic Education Radio ep. #52, Daniel Prince gave some advice on switching the weight from a parent’s carry-on to a child’s to avoid heavy bag fees. We’ve done something similar in a pinch, as the kids carry a lot less than we do.

Packing cubes can help reduce the size and weight of your bags. So can the right suitcase.

Best way to Organize? Find The Best Packing Cubes for Travel!

Label and Tag What’s Important

When kids fly, they can lose track of things. Suitcases and carry-on bags should always have a tag with your name and relevant info. For example, when we left Malaysia to visit family in Japan, our boy checked in a bag with his soccer/football gear.

We never saw it again.

The immediate lesson is this: check to make sure that you have all of your baggage claim slips before you leave the check-in desk. Had we done this, then we would have been in a better position to have it returned. However, there was no label on it from us. There were check-in tags from the airline, but no tags simply with our name and contact information.

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Buy Luggage Tag Initial Bag Tag

Include Email and Skype Contacts

Don’t just write your home address and home phone number, either. Make sure to include an email address or any other reliable way to contact you. For some people, it could be Skype, WhatsApp or some other social media platform, but the point is to make sure there’s a way to contact you wherever you are. Some people even like to attach identity information to small kids in case they wander off at the airport.

Let the Kids Pack Their Own Bags

Flying with kids can become a lesson in responsibility. If they’re old enough (and you have time), let them pack their own bags the day before, and then help them understand how it’s done.

This helps them get organized and understand just how much space they have to work with. It’s good to have children flying and taking responsibility for their flight essentials early. The sooner they learn, the less you have to do on travel day.

What should Kids Pack? Read Our List of Best Travel Gifts for Kids 

Prep & Sort All Documentation

Check into your flight before travel day and (if possible) go ahead and print your boarding passes and/or have them on your smart devices — take a screenshot for times when you won’t have a wifi signal (and some airports won’t have it). Services like Tripit and Tripcase are great for having all your reservation and mileage numbers in one place on your smart device.

Put all passports, boarding passes, visa paperwork, and any other important documentation into one place that you can access easily. I prefer to have everything in a bag that fits in my jacket pocket. No folders: stuff drops out of folders, and you can’t shove it in a pocket quickly. Flight survival depends on keeping up with all your documents!

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Carry paper copies of your passports and other important info. Preferably in a different (but still accessible) spot. Keep a digital copy as well, if you’re comfortable with that. Services like Evernote and Dropbox and other online storage services can work for this.

AT THE AIRPORT: Flying with Kids

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families. Listen in, and please share! Do you have tips for flying with kids? Tell me!

Get to the Airport Early

Out of all the flight tips here for families traveling with children, there is nothing more important than this: arrive really early to the airport.

International passengers are usually recommended to arrive two hours before a flight. I think you should arrive three hours before. Maybe four. I’m not kidding — arriving at the airport super early takes a huge burden off families flying with kids. You are more relaxed at check-in and you are calmer at security.

This goes double for large families. For example, Ka Sundance and his family of eight always get to the airports super early.

Seriously. Arrive at least three hours early. Deal with check-in at your own pace. Then find a place to chill with whatever remaining time you have. For some flights, there may be a few tour groups on your plane, and those guys tend to get to the airport slightly earlier than the usual traveler.

Beat them to check in. You don’t want to be behind them.

Concerned that the kids will get bored if you arrive early? Travel is a great way to teach patience, but don’t worry: you’ve come prepared, right? You have games. You have cards. And you have books and toys and devices.

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

If your kids are young, then you should take advantage of these final hours before you board to tire them out: walk around the terminals with them so they burn up some excess energy before getting on the plane. Otherwise, use this time to find the best food, the best wifi or the most comfortable couches in your airport (if available). This is a great time to read with your kids, as well.

Wear the Right Clothes

When parents fly with kids, they are notorious for holding up the lines at check-in, at security, and in customs, and for a good reason: we have so much stuff to keep track of! Extra tickets, extra passports (in our case, 6 for a family of four), extra devices, wires, and all of the other additional accouterments of travel. Do yourself a favor and make it easy on yourself.

Choose smart airport-day clothing. Wear slip-off shoes, a belt with no metal parts so you don’t have to take it off, and a wrinkle-free jacket with lots of pockets. You could also substitute the jacket for a handbag that has sealable pockets (buttons or zippers).

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Find: Best Travel Jacket for You and Your Family

The goal is to have a place to put everything that must be taken off your body when you go through the metal detector. That means your watch, phone, sunglasses, keys, the above-mentioned pouch, etc. All of it goes into the jacket or bag, which then goes through the machine in one place. Then you can just throw on the jacket or grab the bag and then deal with your watch and other things when you’re ready.

Try to avoid any tight clothing, especially for long-haul flights. DVT — also known as Deep Vein Thrombosis or “economy class syndrome” is a real thing, and is caused by sitting in the same position for long enough that blood clots form in veins.

The name “economy class syndrome” is actually misleading, as it can happen wherever you’re seated on the plane if you don’t have adequate blood flow. Tight clothes and a lack of movement restrict blood flow. We usually wear loose pants. No jogging pants, but no jeans, either. I’ve read about people wearing compression socks as a DVT precaution. Have you tried?

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Be Nice

Model good manners with airport and airline staff. Smile and say please and thank you. Airport interactions can often involve people being rude, agitated and uncooperative. Don’t join in. Some situations require forcefulness, but pick your battles and use aggression sparingly.

Your kids are watching, and keep in mind that many of the problems and stresses of flying today are beyond the control of the staff we interact with. On top of that, many of them are underpaid and running on a few hours of sleep.

I have my problems with airports and airlines, for sure. But the people that we usually interact with are often just cogs in a broken system and reacting accordingly.

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families. Listen in, and please share! Do you have tips for flying with kids? Tell me!

Let the Kids Lead

If you’ve followed my advice for flying with kids so far, then you’ve arrived at the airport super early. Now you have time to let the kids practice navigating the airport for you. Put them in charge.

Have them handle the currency exchange — either by literally working out the math, or just by filling out the form and counting the bills that are returned to you.

Show them your boarding passes, and then walk them through the steps it takes to get you from check-in, through security, and towards the boarding gate. Explain the signage if needed, and then let them lead the way. If they head in the wrong direction, you have time to put them back on course.

Bring an Empty Water Bottle

You’ll need some water once you go through security, so hold onto at least one plastic bottle and fill it at a fountain on the other side of the metal detectors. Keep the bottle throughout the flight, and ask the flight attendant to refill whenever you or your kids are thirsty. Ideally, before they’re thirsty.

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Keep Your Hands Free

Utilize carts and strollers as much as possible. Most flights allow you to push a stroller all the way to the gate. Wheelchairs, too. Take advantage of that.

However, as mentioned above, the kids should be expelling their energy, so put all the bags in a stroller or luggage cart and race them down empty corridors. If you have iPads or other devices, put them in pockets or bags. Or make sure they have their own shoulder strap.

Go to the Bathroom before You Board

A no-brainer, right? If you get to the gate early, try to time it so that the kids go to the bathroom as close to boarding time as possible.

If your kids are like ours, there’s a good chance they’ll say they don’t need to go. Go anyway.

Get on the Plane Early (if you can)

If your kids are of an age that you’ll be allowed to board first, do it. Getting to your seat, putting away your carry-on and organizing your flight essentials is so much easier when the plane is near-empty.

That said, I know some parents that prefer to keep the kiddos off the plane until the very last minute, running them and exhausting them until they have to sit down and buckle up.

If someone isn’t ready to get on the plane yet and splitting up is an option, then let one parent go ahead and board (with/without kids depending on your situation) and get your carry-on stuff sorted and put away. The point is to get on ASAP and have your seats ready quickly when possible.

ON THE PLANE: Flying with Kids

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families. Listen in, and please share! Do you have tips for flying with kids? Tell me!

Go to the Bathroom Now if You didn’t Before Boarding

Flying with kids means countless trips to the toilet. We prefer to hit the bathroom right before we get on the plane, but sometimes that just doesn’t work because you’re waiting in line to board or you’re running to the gate.

In cases like this, try to go to the bathroom as soon as you get on the plane before it fills up with passengers. The airplane toilet won’t be any cleaner than it is right now, and if both kids and parents relieve themselves early, they can settle into their seats for longer.

Get Your Pillow & Blanket ASAP

You may not think you need pillows or blankets when flying with kids. That said, they are good to have just in case and can help little ones get comfortable in a small space.

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Besides, planes get cold, and they often run out of pillows and blankets quickly. Some parents who fly with kids often bring their own blankets and pillows, but our family has enough stuff already, so we use what’s provided.

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

Have Your go-to Bag Below the Seat in Front of You

Sometimes you can’t get up and grab something from the overhead compartment. For example, ear pressure can be tough for some kids, but you can’t stand up during takeoff. Have your remedy (gum, meds, etc) for this accessible, along with whatever you might want during the flight.

It’s best to have all of your flight essentials directly under your seat in front of you. Or in the seat pocket in front of you. Just don’t forget to check that pocket and under the seat, before you get off the plane.

Have Something to Chew On

Ear pressure is painful if not released, and it won’t start until the airplane begins takeoff. Have something to chew on ready and start chewing before the plane reaches the runway.

Flying with Kids - Best Travel Tips

For some kids, ear pressure is extremely uncomfortable. Our girl often had ear infections when she was little, and she hated the taking off/landing procedure. We didn’t give her gum at that age. Instead, we fed her a handful of cookies or carrots until the plane stabilized.

If traveling with babies, give them a bottle to drink during this time.

Set Your Watches to Arrival Time

Whatever time it is at your departure, go ahead and set your watch to your destination’s time zone. If you and the kids fly a lot, buy them a cheap plastic watch, even if it’s only for travel days, and change the time on their watch too. That way they don’t have to ask you “How much longer?” a hundred times.

Seeing your destination’s time helps put your mind into the right time zone. It’s still daylight where you are? Sure, but your watch now says it’s 3 am where you’re going, and that can help get you and kiddos in the right mindset.

Follow Family Bedtime Routines when Possible

Flying with kids doesn’t mean throwing off their nightly routines entirely. If your kids have certain pajamas or bedtime stories, bring them for when it’s time to sleep. The same for dolls or stuffed animals they sleep with (within reason, of course).

Regular bedtime rituals can make them feel more comfortable on a plane, and then drift off to sleep faster.

Sleep When the Kids are Sleeping

Sure, I know you wanted to knock back a few Bloody Marys and catch up on all those action movies you’ve missed. Oh, wait: Sorry, that’s me. But regardless, if you’re drifting off just as your kiddo wakes for a trip to the bathroom, it could spell trouble for everyone involved.

Walk the Aisles

When the little ones get restless, get up and walk the aisles together whenever you can. Head to the bulkhead and stretch, and then head back to your seat. Or make a few rounds if needed.

AFTER YOU LAND: Flying with Kids

Flying with kids? Here are my best tips for how to fly with children. Living in Japan and with family in the USA, I started flying long haul flights with my kids since they were babies, and we’ve been traveling full time as a family since 2013. After all this family travel and interviewing over 100 traveling families, here are my top tips for flying with kids. These should help with flying with toddlers, flying with tweens, flying with teens and flying with large families. Listen in, and please share! Do you have tips for flying with kids? Tell me!

Double-Check the Floor and Seat Pockets

This is where toys, books, devices and the occasional iPod or passport may be forgotten. Whenever flying with kids, check and double check all the pockets before getting off the plane.

My son forgot something once, and we ended up running back to the plane. Thankfully, the flight attendants were still there, who went back to his seat and the folder he left accidentally. We were lucky, though. Don’t risk it.

Take Your Time

Unless you have a connecting flight in the next 90 minutes, relax. Don’t be afraid to be the last ones off the plane.

If you’re traveling with carry-on baggage only, then good for you: you’ll head out faster than everyone else regardless. If you have to go to baggage claim like the rest of us punters, then the extra 5-10 minutes it takes to get off last won’t likely put you behind schedule.

Keep that Empty Water Bottle

Everyone is dehydrated now. Keep at least one plastic bottle filled with water and slug it down once you get off the plane.

Have Your First Few Nights of Accommodation Booked

We sometimes prefer to find our accommodation once we’re in the place we’re visiting. However, after a long-haul flight, you don’t want to be dragging your kids all over the place. So have the first few nights sorted beforehand.

Many people have ALL their nights sorted. That’s fine, too. But when you arrive, you want to know exactly where you’re staying. Why? Because you’ll likely be wrecked and in need of a good night’s rest.

CONCLUSION: Flying with Kids

Our Top 30 Tips for Flying with Kids - Before, During, After the Flight with Children

What have I missed? What tips would you provide on how to fly with kids? I really do want to keep this list as useful and relevant as possible, so leave your tips for flying with kids in the comments, or contact me directly.

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Our Top 30 Tips for Flying with Kids - Before, During, After the Flight with Children

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means, at no extra cost to you,  we might receive a small commission if you make a purchase or book anything using those links. My opinions are my own and I only recommend places/services that I believe will genuinely help your travel. Flying with kids is a challenge, but I hope that my tips help make your family travel day easier.

Photo credits: #1, #3, #4, #9, #10

Comments

  1. Great post and we agree on many things. We are budget, sometimes extreme budget family travellers. The last few years we have moved to travelling with four bags of luggage under 7kg. Also on budget flights we never book allocated seats but arrive early to check-in or do so online – we have never yet been seated apart. We also do not buy food on the plane, we take some and eat when others on the plane eat – keeping it discrete. We almost always stop whenever we can even if it is only for a day in a hub. We follow our childrens lead too. At times they have slept on airport benches or waiting for us to go through immigration. Through out our travels wherever possible we follow the rule of follow a busy day with a quiet day, it works wonders and yes, as soon as we get there we try to follow the local routines of the day. So sleep a little on the first day if you must then wake up local time and stay up till local evening time, even when that is hard…

  2. We often times fly sitting next to someone with newborns, for whatever reason. 9 of 10 times the wee kids are incredibly quiet Jason. The parents act like well oiled machines. Impresses the heck out of me.

  3. Stephanie Lee says:

    I dont have any child of my own, but i am planning to travel with my friend next month so i will have to help looking after her 5 years old daughter haha! Thanks for the great tips! Cheers!

  4. You make a good point that it’s easier to put away your things when there are not many people on the plane. Another thing you could do is to talk to the flight attendant about the questions your kids might have, especially about how safe the plane is. It’d be important for them to get it inspected regularly, so they’d probably be happy to tell you it’s safe, especially if your child is frightened.

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